Narration and Emotions

Narration and Emotions

Most students aren’t stupid, but I think many haven’t been effectively challenged or trained. It’s also harder for the instructor to teach close reading than it is to have meandering discussions about how a given work, which has probably been at best skimmed, makes students feel. Insightful article from author/teacher Jake Seliger. This, again, articulates…

A Schedule of Rest

A Schedule of Rest

Yesterday I mentioned that if an activity would interrupt our schedule of rest, we would probably pass on that opportunity. While that schedule is a bit fluid, I’ve noticed a few patterns since we start more formal homeschool lessons that have informed this schedule. Fridays off. At least until later in the afternoon. Four days…

Connecting ideas

Connecting ideas

A few more thoughts on yesterday’s post: It was pointed out to me that the idea of ‘fossil sunshine’ is quite broad and well-known, and Goudge could have found the idea many places. To add some context to the quote, Hugh Anthony, the reader, is an eight year old reading a geography book under the…

Teaching Grammar

Teaching Grammar

This article from Michael Morpurgo on The Guardian has been making the rounds online. From my perspective as a home educator, I want my kids to understand grammar and have a decent grasp of spelling. However, analyzing language should only ever come after a child has a deep affection for language, years of falling in…

Connections in History

Connections in History

“The king was now in the hands of the armed forces of the kingdom, not of its Parliament” John Schofield, Cromwell to Cromwell, p. 186 “In this way the King became the prisoner of the army instead of the prisoner of the Parliament.” H.E. Marshall, Our Island Story I picked up Cromwell to Cromwell in…